Evergreen Antiques

Fine Scandinavian Antiques

ADD A LITTLE ‘HYGGE’ TO YOUR HOME THIS WINTER

yanna SigenlaubComment

The long dark winter months in Scandinavia are well known, but what is less known is some of the methods they use to get through them.

A simple Danish word – ‘hygge’ basically translating to ‘cozy’ describes one of the most charming ways the Scandinavians tackle the winter. Walk through the city of Copenhagen, drive through a quiet country village, sit in a restaurant or go into any home and you will always see the pure burning light of candles.

Candles are used everyday and everywhere. The result is the amazing variety of candlesticks that can be seen from high style ormolu and marble, graceful brass silver or pewter, simple burl root woods or ultra modern models.

We always find ourselves drawn to collecting candlesticks or candelabras and the warmth and elegance they can add to any interior. 

Browse our lighting collection on 1stdibs.com.

A Desk that speaks for itself

desk, swedish, carl malmstenyanna SigenlaubComment

 

We just brought this desk into the 1stdibs showroom and think the impact it makes speaks for itself. The restorer, who just cleaned and French polished it, couldn’t contain his enthusiasm while working on the piece. He expressed his pleasure in polishing a piece like this that really brings the flamed birch out as well as the contrast between the fruitwood inlays against the rich rosewood background.

The desk is designed by one of Sweden's greatest “Grace Period” architect/designers – Carl Malmsten. The stamps and metal tags indicate it was produced by SMF. Read more about Carl Malmsten here

For more information on this piece please visit 1stdibs.com.

Carl Malmsten

yanna SigenlaubComment

Sweden 1888 - 1972

Carl Malmsten is one of Sweden’s most prominent figures in furniture design. His designs are rooted in Swedish nature and culture. Carl Malmsten was 28 years old when he got his breakthrough, winning both the first and second price in an interior design competition for Stockholm Town-Hall. These were among the first pieces of furniture he had ever designed. Carl Malmsten wanted his furniture to provide a warm and pleasant feeling to the interior as well as being representative. A lot of inspiration came from studying pictures by Swedish national painter Carl Larsson depicting the Swedish family home. The King awarded Carl Malmsten the Professor title in 1936.

Source: deconet.com

Frits Henningsen - uncompromising design

tables, danish, mahoganyyanna SigenlaubComment

Denmark 1889 - 1965

Known both as owner of a furniture-making workshop in Copenhagen and as designer of the workshops products, Henningsen´s work was greatly respected for its very high standards of craftsmanship. Henningsen was an active member of the Cabinetmakers Guild from 1927 on. Every piece with the Henningsen imprimatur is entirely hand-made, with expensive and exotic woods, using exclusively the labor-intensive, traditional methods he inherited from the nineteenth century. www.deconet.com


For Evergreen Antiques the classic sophisticated lines of this table combined with the superb cabinetmaking quality epitomize the work of Henningsen.

This table is made in rich mahogany with brass shoes and seems to be almost emerging from the floor. The tripod base is set in a way that makes the pedestal and legs have both substance and lightness.

So much of his work has the balance we strive to find – a piece that can hold its own in almost any interior.

We currently have two of these tables in inventory.

Hard Not To Find Writing Inspiration Here...

danish, desk, mahogony, secretaireyanna SigenlaubComment

A writing bureau of this quality would undoubtedly come from Copenhagen. It would have been a central piece of furniture and certainly one of the more expensive pieces in a house. We are very much taken by the understated architectural statement the piece makes. Using a desk like this in modern interior offers height in a room but also creates warmth with its rich mahogany and fruitwood inlays.

Due to its clean lines this piece could be mixed with a great variety of other periods of furniture and artwork.

Quite a pleasant place to write a letter or set up your laptop!

Sculpturally Divided

decorative, dividersyanna SigenlaubComment

We like the sculptural as well as decorative feel of this room divider.

Swedish pine wood articulating room divider, produced by Lublins in the 1940s. One end can be rolled in a cylinder and two discs be placed inside probably for plants.

 Approx. measurements: 79in. high  x 93in.-long

From the Royal Attic...

desk, danish, mahogonyyanna SigenlaubComment

Even Royals need to clear out the attic once in a while and in June 2014, 1200 pieces of furniture and household effects from Danish castles were auctioned north of Copenhagen. For the first time in 60 years, the Danish Royal Family put much of their lesser furniture up for sale: desks, mirrors, chairs and even beds that used to furnish a number of castles around the country, e.g. Amalienborg and Fredensborg. One of these items has now found its way into Evergreen’s inventory.  

  • Danish Architects or reading desk in mahogany with an adjustable leather reading or writing stand from Christiansborg Slot, Copenhagen, Circa 1820-30
  • Inventory stamped – C1403
  • S.E (Statens Ejendom) State property stamp with three line and Udgået (discontinued)

Michael Gottlieb Bindesbøll (1800-1856) - Danish Architect

danish, lampyanna SigenlaubComment

Michael Gottlieb Bindesbøll took elements of Greek, Roman and Egyptian design to create a Nordic neoclassicism style. His best example of this style is the Thorvaldsen museum in Copenhagen. 

This table lamp, which is made of bronze and patinated bronze is frequently referenced as a design by MG Bindesbøll. It clearly has all the hallmarks of his taste for the classics and the base is after a form that was often used for a torchere in ancient Greece.

We currently have two of these lamps in inventory that could easily work as a pair. See more details here.